Protect a child.

Be the eyes and ears watching over our most vulnerable population. You don’t need proof, and you can report anonymously.

Oklahoma Child Abuse Hotline:
1-800-522-3511

How to report suspected abuse:

OKDHS child abuse statewide hotline: 1-800-522-3511

  • Callers can remain anonymous.
  • All calls are documented and disposition is assigned. Can create a trail of reporting.
  • Remember, reporting is helping a family make needed changes, obtain services.
  • Reporting makes a difference – pattern may be established, various reporters substantiate.

Signs a child may be at risk
of abuse or neglect:

  • Unexplained bruising or injuries on the child.
  • Parents or caregivers arguing or fighting.
  • Child reporting not having food or being hungry.
  • Child (under the age of 10 or has cognitive delays) taking care of younger children.
  • Has advanced sexual knowledge for their age.
  • Changes in the child’s mood and/or behavior.
  • The child tells you they are unsafe or scared.
  • The child tells you a friend or sibling is unsafe or something bad happened.
  • If you have had no contact at all with a family after many repeated phone calls/messages.
  • Has not received help for physical or medical problems brought to the parents’ attention.
  • Has learning problems, or difficulty concentrating, that cannot be attributed to specific physical or psychological causes.
  • Is always watchful, as though preparing for something bad to happen.
  • Seems to always lack adult supervision.
  • Seems frightened of their parent or caregiver.
  • Abuses animals or pets.

Strategies to keep kids safe.

Parents and Caregivers:

  • Plan now for what you’ll do before you feel overwhelmed and lose control. Where in your home can you safely place your child while you take a break in another room?
  • Maintain a mental list of coping mechanisms to use when you feel you are beginning to lose control of your emotions.
  • Remind yourself of what positive interaction with your child looks like and use those thoughts to regulate your emotions.
  • Good self-care is very important so you don’t reach a breaking point; adequate sleep, proper nutrition and breaks from care-giving duties all give you the energy to hold your emotions in check.

 

Family and Friends:

  • If you know someone who struggles to parent positively, stay in touch with them by phone, text or Facetime to offer support and encouragement.
  • When you call, ask to speak to the children in the home and listen for the tone in their voices. If possible, get a visual assessment of their well-being by asking the parent or caregiver to Facetime with you and include the child so you can see them.

 

Everyone:

  • Be aware of the welfare of children in your environment. If you see or hear something concerning, call or text one of the resource numbers to have trained personnel advise you on what to do with your information.
  • Be aware of what the children in your life are doing on their phones. During periods of isolation, there is risk of cyber-bullying and greater opportunities for child predators when young people are using the internet unsupervised.

Resources to help a child in need.

Parents:

 

Caregivers:

  • Create a plan for yourself to use when you start feeling overwhelmed.
    • Take deep breaths, get fresh air, walk (even if jog in place)
    • Do something that can calm you down – music, read, draw, pet an animal, wash face
    • Call a friend/emotional support line – talking to another person can break the tension/overwhelming moment.
    • Consider what can help – setting a schedule, planned family time, rotating household chores, moving work/study/school areas, getting more rest
  • COPES COVID Emotional Support Line: 918-744-4800
  • COPES Crisis hotline/help: 918-744-4800
  • myStrength app: F&CS has partnered with myStrength to provide you with a free, personal myStrength account. This is a fantastic resource can support parent’s emotional health in the midst of COVID-19. https://www.fcsok.org/mystrength/
  • COVID Resources Hub for mental health and basic needs: www.fcsok.org
  • 2-1-1 Resource Directory: www.211.org
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The COVID-19 Crisis.

It’s no secret COVID-19 is stressful for all of us. Child abuse is very likely to increase as children have been isolated from the people who typically make reports, such as teachers and day care providers. Without this safety net, many children are in danger.

*Based on 2018 data.

How is the pandemic increasing child abuse risks? Download this free resource from OU-TU School of Community Medicine.

Signs of abuse or neglect:

  • Unexplained bruising or injuries on the child.
  • Parents or caregivers arguing or fighting.
  • Child reporting not having food or being hungry.

Strategies to keep kids safe.

Plan now for what you’ll do before you feel overwhelmed and lose control. Where in your home can you safely place your child while you take a break in another room?

Strategies to keep kids safe.

When you call, ask to speak to the children in the home and listen for the tone in their voices. If possible, get a visual assessment of their well-being by asking the parent or caregiver to Facetime with you and include the child so you can see them.

Signs of abuse or neglect:

  • Child (under the age of 10 or has cognitive delays) taking care of younger children.
  • Has advanced sexual knowledge for their age.
  • Changes in the child’s mood and/or behavior.

Strategies to keep kids safe.

If you know someone who struggles to parent positively, stay in touch with them by phone, text or Facetime to offer support and encouragement.

Signs of abuse or neglect:

  • If you have had no contact at all with a family after many repeated phone calls/messages.
  • Has not received help for physical or medical problems brought to the parents’ attention.

Strategies to keep kids safe.

Be aware of the welfare of children in your environment. If you see or hear something concerning, call or text one of the resource numbers to have trained personnel advise you on what to do with your information.

Signs of abuse or neglect:

  • If you have had no contact at all with a family after many repeated phone calls/messages.
  • Has not received help for physical or medical problems brought to the parents’ attention.

Strategies to keep kids safe.

When you call, ask to speak to the children in the home and listen for the tone in their voices. If possible, get a visual assessment of their well-being by asking the parent or caregiver to Facetime with you and include the child so you can see them.

Strategies to keep kids safe.

Be aware of what the children in your life are doing on their phones. During periods of isolation, there is risk of cyber-bullying and greater opportunities for child predators when young people are using the internet unsupervised.